Sparkles (Homepage)

an incomplete list of ways we might make something about/with the penobscot river

documentary

writing (conference in Munich)

photography

building, community projects, hands-on

connection with James

audience/participant line blurring

zateegans built over the entire watershed/map in realtime

duration (and community resilience)

figuring out ways to be on the water (material, literal ways of being on water)

is there something we can build that can be of service?

creating maps, creating scores, appropriating federal symbols

activities that literally breed futurity

what does artmaking bring back/birth? (species, memory, culture?)

facilitation of artists gets handed off to collective

inviting new participants (audience) into multiple relationships w/water

collective singing, collective noisemaking

documentation as integral part of event rather than just a record

container for emergent processes to keep happening with other people

repetition

repetition + duration in relation with each other

blurred boundaries between ourselves and the river (wetness, mobility)

surface of the water as a specific space

creating textures and experiences, could relate to video

how do we communicate to the public?

building tzateegans in multiple locations as hosting sites for other happenings 

the audience floating or being transported by water 

weaving all the words for light on water into a textile and traveling through the water

how do we respond when a place / the archive claims us?

Materials/Works in Progress

Land Acknowledgement Place Setting

Land Acknowledgement “Since we are so bad at genocide, we will now offer these heartfelt words of acknowledgement and apology for our presence in your homeland, yet will neither give the land back or do anything structural to change how we maintain our systems of colonial control over your lands, resources, and cultures.”Darren Ranco, Ph.D […]

Colonial Claim Check

entitles the bearer to claim one (1) unit of water from the water body of your choice. Following stipulations apply: Claimed unit of water must not be removed from the larger body of water. Claimed unit of water must be easily distinguishable from all other water units. Claimed unit of water may not depart the […]

wəčkáwαpan, dawn approaches

This walk gathered just before dawn along the Presumpscot River on September 12, 2020. It meandered through and cut across spaces-between: between surface and depth, the Penobscot and Presumpscot watersheds, Native and settler (be)longings, the human and the more-than-human; between yesterday, today, and something coming. As we crossed from night into day, walkers shared story, […]

MAP RENDERING EXPERIMENT

TYLER RAI: Map rendering play in Photoshop. Island images taken from Google Maps, video still of river by Devon Kelley-Yurdin.

Illustrated Notes by @Lilah

NOV. 16, 2019, MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, PORTLAND, ME WABANAKI PLACE: LANGUAGE AND LANDSCAPEPRESENTATION BY JAMES E. FRANCIS SR., DIRECTOR OF CULTURAL & HISTORIC PRESERVATION, PENOBSCOT NATION

We Are Situated: a journal

Click the button above to explore our co-created journal record of 3 guided days in October 2019 on the Penobscot River and Sugar Island, from the perspective of the guided. The journal format replicates ways in which Wabanaki guiding has been recorded and archived in the past. Its co-authorship honors the core values of our […]

a score for facing ignorance

A score (instructions (for performance?)) written after the on-river intensive in October 2019. Cory Tamler.

Intro video

We made this video in late 2019 to introduce a wider audience to our work. Acknowledgements Opening: Lilah Akins, In Kinship Fellow, sings the Penobscot Water Song during a Fellowship Team Check-In Call Video footage was captured by members of the Fellowship team including: Jennie Hahn, Cory Tamler, Lilah Akins, and Devon Kelley-Yurdin. Video footage […]